2019, Recap & Review

As is customary around this time, it’s a good opportunity to review the year passed and the year ahead, to learn from our mistakes and to build on our successes. After my last blog post about the dividend numbers for December 2019 I decided to make a visual presentation of the year 2019. This is how this fantastic year for the stock market ended for me:

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New & Closed Positions

The most fascinating thing for me in terms of buys and sells was building my position in 3M (MMM). I was a bit early with buying severals shares just above $192 but managed it to average down towards a price of $171. If presented with the opportunity to buy more shares around $160… I’m in. Their streak of increasing their dividends with 61 years just screams quality and staying power.

I’m also glad I took advantage of buying two quality large U.S. banks at depressed Mr. Market prices. In hindsight I should have bought more shares of these businesses. I regard the lack of more money to invest with at that moment as a mistake. I always invest the total amount of money available immediately in dividend paying stocks. As a consequence of that I’m not able to buy stocks for a period of let’s say… three weeks. The next paycheck means the next buy. Sometimes I find some cash here and there which gives me an extra opportunity, but you also have to buy food to feed your kids, you know… But I’m content with initiating a position and hoping to get a rebound in 2020 to buy another bunch of JPM and WFC stocks.

I sold Celgene (CELG) with a small loss after the announcement of being acquired by Bristol-Myers Squibb Company (BMY). This was a speculative buy and once more a lesson to stick with the plan of buying dividend stocks. Another sell was Emerson Electric (EMR) after disappointing figures and several low dividend increases in a row. I sold this position with a profit around 60%. It felt unnatural to sell a dividend growth stock as I plan to never sell my shares, especially of a company with an impressive streak of increasing their dividend for 62 years. But I feel a realistic and competitive plan is missing. It wouldn’t surprise me if it turns out I was too early with my decision to sell and they’re back hitting homerun after homerun in three years. We’ll see.

Missed opportunities

2019 was also a year of some damn fine opportunities. I missed the opportunity of buying Home Depot (HD) and Lowe’s (LOW) at attractive levels of valuation. But we also had a big pullback in stock prices and valuation multiples of Goldman Sachs (GS), A.O Smith (AOS) and Broadcom (AVGO). Man, o man… I just need more money at hand. That’s probably the biggest lesson for me, folks.

Dividend Income & Portfolio Worth

How I would have loved to close 2019 with a FY dividend income above $3,000. Too bad that number isn’t in the books (yet). But closing the year with more than $1,000 or 65% extra in extra dividend income in comparison with 2018 is also something to be proud of.

The line between all numbers of FY dividend income is rising nicely. I’m very content with that and very curious how things will develop in 2020 but also beyond 2020. A nice indicator for 2020 is the forward twelve months of dividend income as of December 31st 2019. That’s already a figure of $3,621. This means an increase in dividend income of 20% already. And we’ve only just begun…

The market value of my stock portfolio was more or less $93,000 at the end of 2019. An increase of $32K means my portfolio saw an increase of almost 50% during 2019. That’s a pretty number and is partly a consequence of a steep decline in stock prices in December 2018. As you can see, I only invested $13K new capital.

Concluding Remarks

Some dividend investors write about their portfolios worth over $500,000 and their FY dividend income crushing the number of $10,000 in 2019. That seems far away in the future, while I also know that’s where I’m heading eventually if I keep focused and disciplined. What a prospect that is.

In my next post I’ll write about my goals for 2020, personally and financially. This will be the first time for me and I already notice the inspiration I get from setting some bars for myself. As they say “If you continuously compete others, you become bitter, but if you continuously compete with yourself you become better.”

Happy investing!

Another Record Month Of Dividend Income, A 53% Growth YoY

The year 2019 has come to an end. This means we can draw up the balance. I think 2019 will turn out to be a year in which the snowball effect of compounding really took shape. But there are still two months of dividend income to report about on my blog: November and December. Let’s start with November. December will follow shortly.

Income numbers November

For this month my total amount of dividend income was $353.43. This is the highest amount of monthly dividend income so far. It seems we’re already heading towards a quarterly dividend of $400, after crushing the number of $300 only recently in August. We are steaming up!

Three companies paid me more than last quarter as a consequence of a raise or larger position. Here’s the breakdown:

Apple (AAPL) – $16.94

Abbvie (ABBV) – $64.20

CVS Caremark (CVS) – $17.00

Delta Air Lines (DAL) – $9.26

Realty Income (O) – $3.86

Omega Healthcare (OHI) – $67.00

Starbucks (SBUX) – $19.27

Tanger Factory Outlets (SKT) – $62.13

AT&T (T) – $85.68

Texas Instruments (TXN) – $8.10

This makes the total amount of dividend income for this month a nice $353.43. My dividend income in August 2019 was $331.12 so that’s an increase of 7% QoQ. My passive income for November 2018 was $230.73 so that’s a very welcome 53% YoY growth. This means another high double-digit growth number, I love it! You can see that four companies contribute a very large part to my dividend income. It’s clear I have to diversify more than I used to do: more companies and a more equal distribution. This will be one of my goals for 2020. Here is the graph that shows all monthly dividends YTD as compared to last year:

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Transactions during November

I didn’t buy any stocks in November, because I wanted some extra money to invest with towards the end of 2019.

Looking Forward

I earned $2,770.27 in dividend income YTD, which means I surpassed the FY 2018 dividend income of $1,793.09 with almost $1,000.

Thanks for for your time.

Happy investing!

 

October 2019 Buy Candidates

The Q3 reporting season will really get underway in mid-October. I’m always looking forward to this exciting time. First of all, you get an update on the business performance of the companies you own. Secondly, there’s always a good business underperforming relative to the short-term oriented market expectations which create attractive buy opportunities.

Last year, there was a fantastic opportunity to pick up a great company like Starbucks (SBUX) for a price around $50, which was equal to a P/E of 20 and a dividend yield of 2.70% at that time. Right now, it trades around $90, a P/E of 31 and a dvidend yield of 1.60%. I was able to benefit from the opportuinty in October last year, because I had some dry powder to invest in SBUX.

There’s no doubt about the strength of the U.S. economy at the moment, especially relative to the economies in Europe. But we also see some signs of a slowing economy for several quarters in a row. It’s very likely that some companies will report a large revenues and/or earning miss with current market conditions; and by that just scaring the hell out of this market. That’s why I’m considering to wait for the earnings season and buy stocks of companies that reported an unexpected miss.

Stocks which look attractive to me at this moment are Johnson & Johnson (JNJ), Altria (MO) and Simon Properties Group (SPG). Since yesterday I have a subscription to FastGraphs so I decided to post some screenshots. I’m planning to use these screenshots more frequently on my blog.

Johnson & Johnson (JNJ)

I just initiated a position in this company and am very eager to buy more shares. You can read more about this purchase right here. The price has stayed in the price range $127-132 in the last two weeks which comes down to a forward P/E of 15 and a dividend yield of 2.95%. Based on their average P/E ratio over 10 years the company is fairly valued. The average dividend growth rate over 10 years is 7%. That means a nice double of their dividend in 10 years using the 72-rule. Still, their dividend payout ratio remains attractively low at 44%. Oh yes, before I forget: J&J has increased their dividend for 56 following years which makes the company a true Dividend King.

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Altria (MO)

My position in this tobacco stock is already meaningful in comparison with my other stock positions. I currently own 97 shares for an average buy price of $53.88. It trades around $40 at the moment; that’s 25% lower and therefor an interesting buy candidate. MO has a streak of 49 years increasing their dividend, just year after year. The P/E ratio is less than 10 and a dividend yield of more than 8.3%! This means the business is historically very cheap and the market isn’t expecting anything good from this company right now.

The tobacco industry has had some negative media attention, because people have died from severe lung illnesses linked to vaping. Some questions still remain to be answered regarding these deaths though. I think the political and media pressure isn’t likely to go away any time soon. But hey, if there’s one company that knows how to deal with laws and regulations and find a workable solution for all parties (well, except for the addicted individuals maybe…) it’s Altria. Besides let’s not forget the government is reaping financial gains of the tobacco industry, whether it’s the traditional cigarretes or vaping products.

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Simon Property Group (SPG)

This high-quality REIT is here for another turn, just like in September it’s also a potential buy in October. They offer a 5.3% dividend yield and trade at an historically low AFFO of 14.5. Their dividend growth rate over 10 years sits around 10%. During the Great Recession SPG lowered its dividend in 2009 and 2010 though. They’ve already acquired the status of a Dividend Contender again. Their AFFO dividend payout ratio has increased from 67% to 71% over 10 years. This shows what a quality business this is. I’m not worried about their debt as SPG is able to refinance their debt at even lower interest rates than right now.

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These are my ideas for October if I’m mentally not strong enough to wait for the next earnings reports ☺️. What are you thinking of? Do you plan to save any extras to take advantage of price declines in the upcoming earnings round mid-October? Do you like the screenshots of FastGraphs?

Thanks for reading and please feel free to comment.

Happy investing!

Yes, I Finally Bought This Dividend King 👊🤘🏾🥂

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That’s how excited I felt when I bought shares of this fantastic business two weeks ago. It was somehow inevitable to buy shares of this dividend king and own it for a very, very long time. For three years I’ve watched the share price going up and down. But finally I laid my hands on this one. I’m talking about Johnson & Johnson (JNJ). The company with 135,000 employees who serve more than 1 billion patients each day.

I bought 9 stocks of Johnson & Johnson at a price of $128.22. At this price the stock yields 2.98%. They’re paying me $0.95 per quarter. So 9 shares equals a yearly $34.20. That’s certainly a nice yield and amount to begin with. It’s below my preferred step-in-yield of 4%, but J&J screams quality all over the place. So a lower yield is fine with me.

Their EPS (ttm) was $6.02 which means I bought the stock at a P/E (ttm) of 21.3 which seems on the high side. But J&J is also trading at approximately 15 times FY2019 earnings estimates of $8.60 per share. That’s more like a reasonable P/E.

They’ve increased their dividends for 57 in a row, which makes them a true dividend king. Another fun fact: JNJ has a streak of 35 consecutive years of adjusted operational earnings growth. Man, this is a high-quality business! In fact, the company is one of the only two companies with a AAA credit rating, the other one being Microsoft (MSFT). Their latest dividend raise was still a nice 5.6%. The 5-year yield on cost of JNJ sits around 3.85% according to GuruFocus.

The dividend payout ratio based on analysts consensus of earnings of $8.60 in 2019 and a ftm dividend of $3.80 comes down to 44%. This gives the company enough opportunities to continue increasing their dividends in the future. Over 20 years, they’ve managed to only increase their payout ratio about 10 percentage points. Talking about value creation and capital allocation! Many large and old corporations get inefficient along the way; they miss the boat, because they took things for granted for too long. But not with this giant: 25% of sales come from products launched in the past 5 years. That’s quite an achievement for such an established company.

GuruFocus states that the current return on capital (Joel Greenblatt) was 110.35%. This means the management of JNJ creates tremendous value for its shareholders. Their RoC is even ranked higher than 95% of the 1011 companies in the Drug Manufacturers industry. That is beyond comprehension, especially for such a large corporation. As a dividend growth investor I like dividend reliability and dividend growth. But, I also like to buy shares of better-than-average companies trading at below-average valuations. Buying JNJ at a forward P/E of 15, a RoC above 100% and a dividend yield of 3% means we’re into something good, folks.

In December 2018 the Board of Directors also announced they had authorized the repurchase of up to $5 billion of the company’s common stock.

I’m very excited about this purchase. It’s a new position for me and I will be watching the stock price closely to buy even more shares. The earnings streams are durable, reliable and stable because of their business diversification. Just like you want with a recession coming our way. J&J has been around for more than 130 years, so they weathered a countless number of economic and market cycles. I’m confident they will also ride this one brilliantly.

What did you buy lately and have you considered buying shares of JNJ?

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Kicking Off With A 184% Increase In January 2019

Well, let’s start right away with my dividend numbers for the first month of 2019. As they say “the first blow is half the battle”. I read about other dividend investors’ tremendous progress in dividend numbers YoY and QoQ. The first month of each quarter has always been a strong month for me in terms of absolute numbers, but also percentage-wise. During the market correction in December I bought many stocks. Let’s see if these transactions added somy dollars to my dividend income in January.

The Numbers

My dividend income for 2019/01 was $216.63. In this month I got several raises as compared to the dividend payment three months ago. Walt Disney (DIS) paid me a small amount more for every share than last quarter, $0.88 which means a $0.04 raise. This is a 4.8% increase from the prior dividend. This month also included an increased dividend from Ventas (VTR) – $0.793 instead of $0.79 for every share I own. This is a 0.3% increase. January included my first dividend income from Illinois Tool Works (ITW). Also Kimco Realty (KIM) and Altria (MO) paid me more YoY and QoQ because of my additional buys during the month of December. The dividend of PepsiCo was paid in January instead of December, so that’s a bit of a cheat ☺️. This sums up to:

Bank of Nova Scotia (BNS) – $28.82

Walt Disney (DIS) – $4.40

Illinois Tool Works (ITW) – $6.00

Kimco Realty (KIM) – $70.00

Altria (MO) – $52.00

Realty Income (O) – $3.76

PepsiCo (PEP) – $8.35

Philip Morris (PM) – $6.84

Ventas (VTR) – $36.46

This makes the total amount of dividend income for this month a nice $216.63. My dividend income for the month of October 2018 was $166.05 so that’s an increase of a nice 30% QoQ. My passive income for the month of January in 2018 was $76.33 so that’s an increase of 184% YoY. Wow, that’s quite a growth rate! Here is the graph, look how beautifully the income numbers rise YoY for January:

Transactions during January

I sold my full stake in Celgene for a price of $87.05 after the acquisition offer of Bristol-Myers. With that money I bought a nice bunch of dividend stocks which were still attactively priced after the market correction in December. I added to still relatively small positions and in all cases below my average buy price. So my yield on cost got a nice boost. Here’s what I bought:

Looking Forward

Up until the last moment I hesitated between Abbvie (ABBV) and CVS Caremark (CVS). I decided to buy CVS because I let many opportunities go by in the past to buy this company at a much lower price than my first relatively small buy. My stake in the tobacco industry has risen nicely with my buys in December and January. The yields are on the high side so this promises a lot for the upcoming months in 2019. The numbers for January are staggering. It’s very cool to see this snowball effect getting bigger and bigger every month, quarter and year. What an amazing investing strategy this is.

Happy investing!

December 2018 – Again a month of growth, 12% YoY

I’m late with writing about my progress in dividend income. It’s already April 2019 and the last month I wrote about was November 2018. That seems like ages ago. My private life has been more turbulent so far than during 2018. But I do love writing about this stuff, so I’m eager to keep blogging. Anyway, today I’m writing about my progress in building up a dividend income during the month of December. It’s always nice to close a year of hard work and investing to see where we stand on our path to financial independence and early retirement. So, let’s hit it!

Income Numbers

The amount of dividend income for month 2018/12 was $131.95. In this month I got one small raise in dividend income from Realty Income (O) as compared to the dividend payment three months ago. “Slowly but surely” seems to sum this up pretty well. This was the only raise I got. So, to be honest, that’s a bit disappointing. But this month included my first dividend income by the companies Blackrock (BLK) and Stanley Black & Decker (SWK). I initiated a small position during the last months of 2018 and would love to build a bigger position. Hopefully, Mr. Market will freak out again because of growing market uncertainties like Brexit, trade wars between the USA, EU and China and signs of a coming recession. So my dividend income for the month of December was generated by:

Bank of America (BAC) – $5.85

Blackrock (BLK) – $9.39

Cummins (CMI) – $11.40

Emerson Electric (EMR) – $4.90

General Motors (GM) – $26.98

Norfolk Southern (NSC) – $4.80

Realty Income (O) – $3.75

Southern Company (SO) – $21.00

Stanley Black & Decker (SWK) – $7.92

Union Pacific (UNP) – $4.80

Exxon Mobil (XOM) – $31.16

Breakdown of Dividend Income YoY

My passive income in the month of December last year was $125.21 so that’s an increase of 5%. That’s on the low side for me, but this month has been lagging behind for a while now. The progress QoQ was a bit higher, just 7%.

The dividend income for the month of December leads to the next graph:

Transactions in December

I decided to sell my full position in General Motors (GM), because the dividend hadn’t been raised for a couple of years. I believe it’s still a good value play. But when stock prices declined so rapidly in December I decided to buy other stocks with this money. Here’s what I bought:

Looking Forward

In order to raise my dividend income for this month going forward I selected the companies Boeing (BA), Home Depot (HD), Johnson & Johnson (JNJ), Lockheed Martin (LMT), 3M (MMM) and Visa (V). They’re all on my watchlist “2019” and my watchlist “buys during the next recession”. Some of these candidates would also give me exposure to new industries and increase my weighted dividend growth rate. Lovely.

Dividend Income FY2018

With the month of December I collected a nice $1,793.09 during 2018. My total dividend income in 2017 was $827.81. That’s an increase of just less than 119%. Wow! Rock solid! This is very encouraging. And we’re already on our way for 2019. The increase in terms of percentages will decline with time, but the increae in dollar amounts will get larger and larger. Just as Sam Cooke sang in 1964, “Ain’t that good news?” 👍

$$$ 136% Increase YoY In Passive Income For 2017/11 $$$

Finally, I have some time to write a blog post. Time does fly! This blog post, as the title suggests, is about my progress in dividend income for the month of November. The year 2018 has almost come to an end. Next year is going to be as excited and turbulent as 2018. At least, I hope so… Because with turbulence comes oportunities for our DGI community. But first, the numbers for the month of November.

Income numbers

The total amount of dividend income in the month of November was $230.73. This is my second monthly dividend income above the $200 threshold after the month of August. I like to see my income passing all kind of psychological numbers like $100, $200, $250, etc. It’s very encouraging, because these numbers look past the horizon when you just start with dividend growth investing. Only one company paid me more than last quarter as as consequence of a raise: good ol’ Realty Income with an increase of $0.01 ☺️. My dividend income for this month was divided by payments of 9 well-known and great companies:

Apple (AAPL) – $16.06

Abbvie (ABBV) – $9.60

CVS Caremark (CVS) – $2.00

Delta Airlines (DAL) – $8.05

Realty Income (O) – $3.75

Omega Healthcare (OHI) – $66.00

Starbucks (SBUX) – $16.92

Tanger Factory Outlets (SKT) – $38.85

AT&T (T) – $69.50

This makes the total amount of dividend income for this month a nice $230.73. My dividend income for the month of August 2018 was $209.12 so that’s an increase of 10% QoQ. Always nice to see a double-digit growth number here, although I’m more interested in the YoY growth.

YoY Growth

My passive income for November 2017 was $97.84 so that’s an increase of 136% YoY. This means a triple-digit growth number, I love it! Abbvie paid me my first dividend of $9.60 and my income from AT&T increased from $57.50 to $69.50 YoY. I’m very excited to have Abbvie and Starbucks in my basket. They’ll average up my dividend growth numbers. The dividends of OHI, SKT and T are the big ones this month. Here is the graph that shows all monthly dividends YTD as compared to last year:

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Buys In November

During November I added to my positions in Altria (MO) and AT&T (T). I bought 16 stocks of Altria at a price of $53.58 on November 28th and 29 stocks of AT&T as cheap as $30.28 on November 16th. Happily, these buys also lowered the average price of both positions. I always like that as it will increase my total return as I plan to never sell these positions.

In summary, November was a good month with solid growth numbers YoY and additions to my positions at very attractive prices. I’ll post my progress for the month of December this weekend.

Happy investing!