Yes, I Finally Bought This Dividend King 👊🤘🏾🥂

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That’s how excited I felt when I bought shares of this fantastic business two weeks ago. It was somehow inevitable to buy shares of this dividend king and own it for a very, very long time. For three years I’ve watched the share price going up and down. But finally I laid my hands on this one. I’m talking about Johnson & Johnson (JNJ). The company with 135,000 employees who serve more than 1 billion patients each day.

I bought 9 stocks of Johnson & Johnson at a price of $128.22. At this price the stock yields 2.98%. They’re paying me $0.95 per quarter. So 9 shares equals a yearly $34.20. That’s certainly a nice yield and amount to begin with. It’s below my preferred step-in-yield of 4%, but J&J screams quality all over the place. So a lower yield is fine with me.

Their EPS (ttm) was $6.02 which means I bought the stock at a P/E (ttm) of 21.3 which seems on the high side. But J&J is also trading at approximately 15 times FY2019 earnings estimates of $8.60 per share. That’s more like a reasonable P/E.

They’ve increased their dividends for 57 in a row, which makes them a true dividend king. Another fun fact: JNJ has a streak of 35 consecutive years of adjusted operational earnings growth. Man, this is a high-quality business! In fact, the company is one of the only two companies with a AAA credit rating, the other one being Microsoft (MSFT). Their latest dividend raise was still a nice 5.6%. The 5-year yield on cost of JNJ sits around 3.85% according to GuruFocus.

The dividend payout ratio based on analysts consensus of earnings of $8.60 in 2019 and a ftm dividend of $3.80 comes down to 44%. This gives the company enough opportunities to continue increasing their dividends in the future. Over 20 years, they’ve managed to only increase their payout ratio about 10 percentage points. Talking about value creation and capital allocation! Many large and old corporations get inefficient along the way; they miss the boat, because they took things for granted for too long. But not with this giant: 25% of sales come from products launched in the past 5 years. That’s quite an achievement for such an established company.

GuruFocus states that the current return on capital (Joel Greenblatt) was 110.35%. This means the management of JNJ creates tremendous value for its shareholders. Their RoC is even ranked higher than 95% of the 1011 companies in the Drug Manufacturers industry. That is beyond comprehension, especially for such a large corporation. As a dividend growth investor I like dividend reliability and dividend growth. But, I also like to buy shares of better-than-average companies trading at below-average valuations. Buying JNJ at a forward P/E of 15, a RoC above 100% and a dividend yield of 3% means we’re into something good, folks.

In December 2018 the Board of Directors also announced they had authorized the repurchase of up to $5 billion of the company’s common stock.

I’m very excited about this purchase. It’s a new position for me and I will be watching the stock price closely to buy even more shares. The earnings streams are durable, reliable and stable because of their business diversification. Just like you want with a recession coming our way. J&J has been around for more than 130 years, so they weathered a countless number of economic and market cycles. I’m confident they will also ride this one brilliantly.

What did you buy lately and have you considered buying shares of JNJ?

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7 thoughts on “Yes, I Finally Bought This Dividend King 👊🤘🏾🥂

  1. You named all the good reasons to own this wonderful company. JNJ stands as synonym for high quality and it’s a defenisve wealth multiplier machine. No wonder, JNJ is a core holding for many fellow dividend growth investors. Good move IMO. Congrats!
    -SF

    Like

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